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Scripps Florida Intern's Photographs to be Featured at Hibel Museum of Art Exhibition

Image: http://www.scripps.edu/news/press/images/1_misc_images/20100218_Metzner/20100218_metzner.jpg

Caption: Photo by Michael Metzner

JUPITER, FL, February 18, 2010 – The photographs of a young Scripps Florida intern will be the featured attraction at a solo exhibition at the Hibel Museum of Art on the campus of Florida Atlantic University (FAU) in Jupiter.

All of the photographs in the exhibition – of an extraordinary collection of 17th and 18th century hand-painted fans – were taken by Michael Metzner, a 19-year-old sophomore at Florida Atlantic University and a research intern in Scripps Florida's Department of Metabolism and Aging.

The exhibition, entitled Perceptions of Beauty: An Artistic Photographic Expression of Antique Fans, starts Thursday, February 25, 2010, with an opening night reception from 6:30 to 8:30PM. The exhibition will run throughout the season.

While admission to the opening night is complimentary, a portion of the proceeds from any sales will go to scholarships for underprivileged children. Reservations should made by Friday, February 19 by calling (561) 622-5560. Valet parking will be available.

The Hibel Museum of Art is located at the corner of University and Main Street in Abacoa, diagonally across from Roger Dean Stadium.

Interest in the Arts & Science

Metzner, whose family lives in nearby Wellington, is currently a student in the Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College at FAU's campus in Jupiter, and is pursuing a dual major in biochemistry and the visual arts. He began working as a research intern in the laboratory of Roy Smith, the Department of Metabolism and Aging chair, in April 2009.

"I like having a double major," he said. "Even though I'm heavily invested in medicine, it's important for me to have an artistic outlet as well. My goal right now is to become a pediatric surgeon, but that isn't set in stone. I have a lot of time yet."

Always intrigued by the arts, Metzner got his first camera only in 2007. Soon afterwards, he was named a Homegrown Artist at the ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival in Jupiter, was a finalist the 2009 Nikon College Photography Contest, and had his work published in Nikon's Best of College Photography.

Metzner said he was invited to photograph the fan collection and worked on the project for a year. By the time the photography was completed, the photographs were selected for a solo exhibition – the first time the work of a single artist other than Edna Hibel has been exhibited at the museum. Hibel, who is 93-years-old, has often been referred to as the United States' most versatile artist, as well as its best colorist. She received the World Cultural Council's Leonardo da Vinci World Award of Arts in 2001.

The Hibel Museum is the world's largest repository of Edna Hibel's art, and the world's only non-profit, public museum dedicated to the art of a living American woman.

About The Scripps Research Institute

The Scripps Research Institute is one of the world's largest independent, non-profit biomedical research organizations, at the forefront of basic biomedical science that seeks to comprehend the most fundamental processes of life. Scripps Research is internationally recognized for its discoveries in immunology, molecular and cellular biology, chemistry, neurosciences, autoimmune, cardiovascular, and infectious diseases, and synthetic vaccine development. Established in its current configuration in 1961, it employs approximately 3,000 scientists, postdoctoral fellows, scientific and other technicians, doctoral degree graduate students, and administrative and technical support personnel. Scripps Research is headquartered in La Jolla, California. It also includes Scripps Florida, whose researchers focus on basic biomedical science, drug discovery, and technology development. Scripps Florida is located in Jupiter, Florida.

About the Hibel Museum

The Hibel Museum's mission is to serve as a multi-functional cultural and educational institution where the public can find resources for the study and appreciation of a broad collection of Hibel's art, antique artifacts, and art in general. Cultural programs such as summer art camps, year-round art classes for children, adult art workshops, teas, and the Promenade Concert Series are available to community residents and visitors alike. The museum not only showcases more than 1,200 pieces of Edna Hibel's art, but also hosts other art collections on tour.


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