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The Kodadek Lab

Thomas Kodadek, Ph.D.

Born
March 11, 1959, Chicago, IL

Current Position
Professor of Chemisry and Cancer Biology
The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida
130 Scripps Way, #3A2
Jupiter, FL 33458

Previous Positions
Director, UT-Southwestern Division of Translational Research (2005-2009). Professor of Internal Medicine and Molecular Biology (1998-Present) University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin (1997-1998) Associate Professor (1993-1997), Assistant Professor (1987-1992).

Education
B.S.(Chemistry) University of Miami (FL)
Ph.D. (Organic Chemistry) Stanford University (Advisors: James Collman, John Brauman)
Post-doctoral (Biochemistry) UCSF (Advisor: Bruce Alberts)

Awards
Jane Coffin Childs Postdoctoral Fellow (1985-1987)
American Cancer Society Junior Faculty Research Award (1989-1991)
Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (elected 1999)
NIH Director’s Pioneer Award (2006-2011)
Outstanding Teacher, Medical School (MS1) Biochemistry (2007)
F1000 Chemical Biology Faculty Member of the Year Award (2015)
Cope Scholar Award (American Chemical Society) (2016)
Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (elected 2016)
Makenini Award, American Peptide Society (2017)

Professional Activities and Services
Founding Chief of the Editorial Board Molecular BioSystems, Royal Society of Chemistry (1/04-12/09)
Editorial Board (1/98-Present): Chemistry & Biology
Associate Editor (6/99-5/03): Chemistry & Biology
Editorial Board (1/97-7/01): Chemtracts-Organic Chemistry
Co-Editor of Jan. 2000, Feb. 2005 Issues of Current Opinion In Chemical Biology
Vice Chair (2002) and Chair (2004), Gordon Conference Chemistry and Biology of Peptides
Member (2000-2004) and Chair (2002-2004) of the NIH Bioorganic and Natural Products (BNP) Study Section.
Member, Nucleic Acids Study Section, American Cancer Society (1995-98).
Member, DOE special study section for materials science research (1994).
Member of the American Chemical Society, AAAS, Royal Society of Chemistry.
Steering Committee Member, NIH Chemistry Assistant Professor Mentoring Workshops
Member, Scientific Advisory Board of Stratagene Inc., La Jolla, CA
Member, Scientific Advisory Board, Receptors, LLC, Chaska, MN
Member, Scientific Advisory Board of Sigma-Aldrich, Stl. Louis, MO.
Member, Scientific Advisory Board, Opko Health Inc, Miami, FL.
Co-Chair, NHLBI Committee for Strategic Planning in Emerging Technologies (2006)
Board Member, U.S. HUPO Coordinating Committee (2007)
Member, NIH committee on the Future of the Roadmap (2006)
Member, Special Study Section for NIH Director's Innovator Awards (2007-14)
Member, The Protein Society
Member, The American Chemical Society

Invited Lectures

1 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Chapel Hill, NC "In vitro studies of phage T4 homologous recombination" October, 1986.
2 FASEB Conference on Genomic Rearrangements, Copper Mountain, CO "The enzymology of genetic recombination" June, 1987.
3 University of North Carolina, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC "The enzymology of genetic recombination" February, 1988.
4 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, Cold Spring Harbor, NY "Characterization of accessory factors for homologous recombination" September, 1988.
5 Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX "The enzymology of homologous recombination" May, 1989.
6 Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA "The enzymology of genetic recombination" October, 1989.
7 MIT, Cambridge, MA "The enzymology of genetic recombination" October, 1989.
8 University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX "Molecular engineering of novel catalytic systems: Applications in chemistry and biochemistry" December, 1989.
9 NSF Workshop on Asymmetric Synthesis, Pingree Park, CO "Novel catalytic chemistry of metalloporphyrins" July, 1990.
10 Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, TX "How to 'fine tune' the activity of natural and artificial enzymes" February, 1991.
11 Trinity University, San Antonio, TX "How to 'fine tune' the activity of natural and artificial enzymes" February, 1991.
12 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX "Controlling catalyst activty: A central problem in chemistry and biology" March, 1991.
13 The University of Texas Forum on Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Austin, TX "Multiple roles for DNA helicases in homologous strand exchange" May, 1991.
14 FASEB Conference on Genetic Recombination, Sax River, VT "Multiple roles for DNA helicases in homologous strand exchange", July, 1991.
15 American Society for Microbiology Annual Meeting, Austin, TX "The enzymology of bacteriophage T4 homologous recombination" October, 1991.
16 American Chemical Society, Southwest Regional Meeting, San Antonio, TX "Novel catalytic chemistry of metalloporphyrins" October, 1991.
17 Lost Pines Conference on Molecular Biology, Smithville, TX-Chair of Structural Biology Session, October, 1991.
18 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI "Controlling catalyst selectivity: A central problem in chemistry and biology", October, 1991.
19 University of Wisconsin (Dept. of Biochemistry), Madison, WI "The enzymology of homologous recombination", October, 1991.
20 University of Kansas (Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry) - Eli Lilly Lecturer, Lawrence, KA "Controlling catalyst selectivity: A central problem in chemistry and biology" October, 1991.
21 University of Washington, Seattle, WA "Controlling catalyst selectivity: A central problem in chemistry and biology" November, 1991.
22 University of Oregon, Eugene OR "Novel catalytic chemistry of metalloporphyrins" November, 1991.
23 University of Oregon (Molecular Biology Institute), Eugene, OR "The enzymology of homologous recombination" November, 1991.
24 Stanford University, Stanford, CA "Controlling catalyst selectivity: A central problem in chemistry and biology" November, 1991.
25 Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA "The enzymology of homologous recombination" November, 1991.
26 24th Annual Symposium on Oxidation Chemistry, Hiroshima, Japan "Novel catalytic chemistry of metalloporphyins" November, 1991.
27 Teijin Institute for Biomedical Research, Tokyo, Japan "Novel catalytic chemistry of metalloporphyins" November, 1991.
28 Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan "Novel catalytic chemistry of metalloporphyins" November, 1991.
29 Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan "Novel catalytic chemistry of metalloporphyins" November, 1991.
30 Texas A&M University (Department of Biochemistry), College Station, TX "The enzymology of homologous recombination" January, 1992.
31 University of Houston, Houston, TX "Novel catalytic chemistry of metalloporphyins" January, 1992.
32 Keystone Symposium on DNA Replication and Recombination, Taos, NM "Protein-protein interactions in the assembly of the presynaptic filament for homologous recombination" January, 1992.
33 Penn State University, University Park, PA "Controlling catalyst selectivity: A central problem in chemistry and biology" April, 1992.
34 National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD "The enzymology of homologous recombination" April, 1992.
35 ACS Symposium on Asymmetric Catalysis, San Francisco, CA "Synthesis and catalytic activity of chiral metalloporphyin complexes" April, 1992.
36 ACS Symposium on Bioinorganic Chemistry, San Francisco, CA "Biochemical and spectroscopic studies of a new metal-containing DNA-bindng motif" April, 1992.
37 University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX "Protein Machines in Transcription and Recombination", April, 1992.
37 Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX "The Enzymology of Homologous Recombination", May, 1992.
38 NSF Workshop on Reactive Intermediates, Shelter Island, NY "Reactive intermediates in the rhodium porphyrin-catalyzed cyclopropanation of alkenes" September, 1992.
39 Scripps Institute, La Jolla, CA "Design and characterization of selective catalysts: Studies in asymmetric synthesis and macromolecular recognition" November 1992.
40 Hoerchst-Celanese Corporation, Corpus Christi, TX "Asymmetric catalysis using metalloporphyrins" August, 1993.
40 University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX "Asymmetric catalysis using metalloporphyrins" September, 1993.
41 Symposium on DNA-Binding Drugs, American Chemical Society Southwest Regional Meeting, Austin, TX "Mechanism of transcription factor-DNA binding" October, 1993.
42 Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK "Chemistry of transcriptional activation" March, 1994.
43 24th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT "Chemistry of transcriptional activation" June, 1994.
44 University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT "Enzymology of Homologous Recombination" March 1995.
46 Boehriger-Manheim Corp., CT, "Semi-rational and completely irrational approaches to molecular design", July, 1995.
47 Rockefeller University, NY,NY, "Activator-TFIID interactions in the regulation of eukaryotic transcription", July, 1995.
45 ACS Symposium on Recent Advances In Metalloporphyrin Chemistry, American Chemical Society National Meeting, Chicago, IL, "Semi-rational design of porphyrin-based asymmetric catalysts", August, 1995.
48 Ambion Corp., Austin, TX, "Enzymology of homologous recombination" August, 1995.
49 Baylor Medical School, Houston, TX, "Protein machines involved in transcription and homologous recombination" November, 1995.
50 Penn. St. University, University Park, PA, "Protein machines involved in transcription and homologous recombination" November, 1995.
51 Michigan St. University, East Lansing, MI, "How do transcriptional activators and repressors work?" January, 1996.
52 Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, "Mechanistic studies of transcriptional regulation" April, 1996.
53 UT-Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX, "New methods for the study of multiprotein complexes" April, 1996.
54 Baylor University, Waco, TX, "New methods for the study of multiprotein complexes" April, 1996.
55 Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, "New methods for the study of multiprotein complexes" May, 1996.
56 ACS Symposium on the Chemistry of Gene Expression, American Chemical Society National Meeting, Orlando, FL, "New methods for the study of multiprotein transcription complexes", August, 1996.
57 University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, "New methods for the study of multiprotein transcription complexes", September, 1996.
58 Boston University, Boston, Mass., "New methods for the study of multiprotein transcription complexes", October, 1996.
59 MIT, Cambridge, Mass., "New insights into the regulation of eukaryotic transcription", October, 1996.
60 UT-Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, "New methods for the study and manipulation of multiprotein complexes", March, 1997.
61 Stratagene Corp., La Jolla, CA, ""New methods for the study and manipulation of multiprotein complexes", July, 1997.
62 Rice University, Houston, TX ""New methods for the study and manipulation of multiprotein complexes", September, 1997.
63 Boehringer-Ingelheim Corp., Stanford, CT ""New methods for the study and manipulation of multiprotein complexes", September, 1997.
64 U. of Massachusetts Medical School, Worchester, MA, ""New insights into the mechanism of action of transcriptional activators and repressors", October, 1997.
65 American Society of Microbiology Meeting, Houston, TX, ""New insights into the mechanism of action of transcriptional activators and repressors", November, 1997.
66 Baylor Medical School, Houston, TX "New methods for the study and manipulation of multiprotein complexes", November, 1997.
67 UT-San Antonio Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, "New methods for the study and manipulation of multiprotein complexes", November, 1997.
68 UT-Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, "Magic bullet peptides: New tools for the manipulation of macromolecular complexes", April, 1998.
69 UT-Dallas, Dallas, TX "New methods for the study and manipulation of multiprotein complexes", September, 1998.
70 UT-Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, "New chemical and biological methods for the study of multiprotein complexes", December, 1998.
71 UT-Arlington, Arlington, TX "New chemical and biological methods for the study of multiprotein complexes", April 1999.
72 Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL "New chemical and biological methods for the study of multiprotein complexes", April, 1999.
73 New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM "New chemical and biological methods for the study of multiprotein complexes", November, 1999.
74 Peptides Gordon Research Conference, Ventura, CA "Library-derived peptides as reagents for the detection, manipulation and purification of protein complexes" February, 2000.
75 Stephen F. Austin University Biotechnology Symposium, Keynote Address, Nacagdoches, TX "Beyond antibodies: New magic bullets for the selective manipulation of biological pathways" February, 2000.
76 Life Technologies, Rockville, MD "Towards artificial antibodies" March, 2000.
77 UCSF, SF, CA "New methods for the study and manipulation of multiprotein complexes" April, 2000.
78 Touchstone Diabetes Center, UT-Southwestern, Dallas, TX "Chemical biotechnology" April, 2000.
79 Cambridge Healthtech Institute Conference on Recombinant Antibodies, Baltimore, MD "Epitope-binding peptides and peptidomimetic compounds: Towards low molecular weight antibody equivalents" June 2000.
80 Wyeth-Amerest Research Laboratories, Pearl River, NY "New methods for the study and manipulation of protein machines" June, 2000.
81 Sigma Corporation, St. Louis, MO "Towards artificial antibodies" July, 2000.
82 University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX "New methods in chemical biology" September, 2000.
83 Keystone Meeting on Mechanisms of Eukaryotic Transcription, Sante Fe, NM "The 19S regulatory particle of the proteasome is required for efficient RNA polymerase II elongation" February, 2001.
84 Yale University, New Haven, Conn. "Chemical and biological approaches to understanding the role of the 19S proteasome regulatory complex in transcription" May, 2001.
85 Alfred Spinks Symposium on Chemical Biology, Royal Society Meeting, London, UK "The role of the 19S proteasome regulatory particle in transcription", May, 2001.
86 Gordon Conference on Bioorganic Chemistry, NH "Second generation proteomics" June, 2001.
87 British Association for Cancer Research Conference on Forging An Alliance Between Genomics, Proteomics And Chemical Biology, Chesam, Buckinghamshire, UK "Second generation proteomics" September, 2001.
88 Louisiana State Medical Center, Shreveport, LA "New insights into the role of the proteosome in transcription" January, 2001.
89 Trinity University, San Antonio, TX "Chemical biology in the post-genomic era" March, 2002.
90 Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. "Chemistry as a key tool in proteomics" March 2002.
91 Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. "New insights into the role of the proteasome in transcription" March 2002.
92 University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, IL "Second generation proteomics" March, 2002.
93 Washington State University, Pullman, WA "Second generation proteomics" April, 2002.
94 Rockefeller University, NY, NY "Chemical and biological studies of the proteasome and its role in transcription" April, 2002.
95 UCLA, Los Angeles, CA "Second generation proteomics" May 2002.
96 Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA "Chemical and biological studies of the proteasome and its role in transcription" May, 2002.
97 National Cancer Institute-Innovative Technologies and Materials Conference, Chantilly, VA "Towards protein-detecting microarrays", July 2002.
98 California Institute of Techology, Pasadena, CA "Chemical tools for proteomics research" January, 2003.
99 Colorado State University. Boehringer-Ingelheim Lecturer, Fort Collins, CO "Chemical tools for proteomics research" February, 2003.
100 Keystone Meeting on Transcriptional Mechanisms, Sante Fe, NM "Novel roles of proteasomal proteins in transcription".
101 Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD "Chemical and biological studies of the proteasome and its role in transcription" February, 2003.
102 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI "Chemical tools for proteomics research", April 2003.
103 University of Georgia, Athens, GA "Chemical tools for proteomics research", April, 2003.
104 Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA "Novel roles of the proteasome in transcription" April, 2003.
105 National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Symposium on High-Throughput Biology, Bethesda, MD "Towards protein-detecting microarrays based on synthetic capture agents", June, 2003.
106 Cornell University Summer School In Chemical Biology "Protein function arrays and protein-detecting arrays: The state of the art" Ithaca, NY, July, 2003.
107 Canadian Chemical Society Meeting, Ottawa, Canada "Chemical tools for proteomics research" August, 2003.
108 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI "The many roles of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway proteins in transcription". September, 2003.
109 Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA "Multiple roles of ubiquitin/proteasome proteins in transcription" October, 2003.
110 Systems Biology Conference, St. Louis, MO "Protein-detecting microarrays" November, 2003.
111 Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA "Protein-detecting microarrays", December, 2003.
112 Gordon Research Conference-The Chemistry & Biology of Peptides, Ventura, CA "Chemical Tools for Proteomics Research" February, 2004.
113 FASEB National Meeting, Washington, D.C. "Protein-Detecting Microarrays" April, 2004.
114 Gordon Research Conference-Bioorganic Chemistry, Andover, NH "New chemical tools for proteomics science" June, 2004.
115 American Heart Association's Council on Basic Cardiovascular Sciences: Stress Signals, Molecular Targets, and the Genome, Stevenson, WA "Protein-detecting microarrays" July, 2004.
116 Chips to Hits Conference, Boston, MA "Protein-detecting microarrays" September, 2004.
117 Yale University, New Haven, CT "New chemical tools for proteomics research" September, 2004.
118 Wayne State University, Detroit, MI "New chemical tools for proteomics research" October, 2004.
119 Abbott Endowed Lectureship, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX "New chemical tools for proteomics research" October, 2004.
120 University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX "New chemical tools for proteomics research" October, 2004.
121 American Institute of Chemical Engineering Nation Meeting, Austin, TX "Protein-detecting microarrays" November, 2004.
122 University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN "Chemical tools for proteomics research", November, 2004.
123 Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX "New chemical tools for proteomics research" February, 2005.
124 NIH symposium: Exploring the Proteome III: The Challenge of Cellular Dynamics , Bethesda, MD "Methods for exploring the dynamics of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions" April, 2005.
125 Burnham Institute Symposium "Frontiers in Chemical Biology"La Jolla, CA "Chemical tools for studying and manipulating the proteome" April, 2005.
126 American Peptide Society 19th Annual Symposium, San Diego, CA "Peptoid microarrays as tools for monitoring and manipulating the proteome" June, 2005.
127 Gordon Research Conference-Combinatorial Chemistry, Andover, NH "Functional and Analytical Applications of Combinatorial Peptoid Libraries In Biology and Medicine" August, 2005.
128 Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Mechanisms of Eukaryotic Transcription, Cold Spring Harbor, NY "Dynamics of transcription factor-DNA interactions", September, 2005.
129 Hammon Cancer Center, UT-Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX "Proteomic tools for medicine and biology" September, 2005.
130 Boston College, Boston, MA "New chemical tools for proteomics research" September, 2005.
131 American Heart Association National Meeting, Dallas, TX "Genome expression profiling" November, 2005.
132 Emory University, Atlanta, GA "Chemical tools for proteomics research" February, 2006.
133 Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX "Role of ubiquitin/proteasome pathway proteins in RNA polymerase II transcription" March, 2006.
134 ASBMB Meeting, San Francisco, CA "Small molecule microarrays as tools in chemistry and biology"April, 2006.
135 Experimental Biology Meeting, San Francisco, CA "Pharmacological manipulation of gene expression: Towards synthetic transcription factors" April 2006.
136 U.S. Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Council Meeting, Tuscon, AZ "Opportunities at the chemistry/biology interface"May, 2006.
137 NIH CMLD National Symposium, Boston, MA "Monitoring and manipulating the proteome with combinatorial peptoid libraries" June, 2006.
138 Bristol Myers-Squibb, Groton, Wallingford, CN "Monitoring and manipulating the proteome with combinatorial peptoid libraries" October, 2006.
139 UC-Riverside Chemical Genetics Program Retreat, Lake Arrowhead, CA "Chemistry and Biology of the Proteasome" October, 2006.
140 William & Lee University, Lexington, VA "Chemistry and Biology of the Proteasome" November, 2006.
141 University of Virginia, Charlottsville, VA "Chemistry and Biology of the Proteasome" November, 2006.
142 HUPO Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA "New approach to immunobiomarker discovery" November, 2006.
143 American Heart Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL "New approach to immunobiomarker discovery" November, 2006.
144 UT Metroplex Days, Dallas, TX "Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome" November, 2006.
145 California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA "Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome" January, 2007.
146 Oxford University, Oxford, UK "Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome" February, 2007.
147 Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center, NY, NY "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" April, 2007.
148 University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" May, 2007.
149 Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome"
150 Gordon Research Conference – Nucleic Acids, Andover, NH "Novel roles of the proteasome in modulating transcription factor function" June, 2007.
151 NIH Director's Pioneer Award Symposium, Bethesda, MD "Profiling immune system responses using peptoid microarrays" September, 2007.
152 UT-San Antonio School of Medicine, San Antonio, TX "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" September, 2007.
153 Kansas University, Lawrence, KN "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" September, 2007.
154 University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX "Profiling immune system responses using peptoid microarraysÓ November, 2007.
155 Purdue University, Lafayette, IN "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" December, 2007.
156 Huntsman Cancer Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT "Intersections of Transcription and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway: Basic and Applied Studies" January, 2008.
157 Gordon Research Conference – Chemistry & Biology of Peptides, Ventura, CA "Peptoid libraries as a source of protein ligands" February, 2008.
158 Keystone Meeting on Beta Cell Biology, Snowbird, UT "Artificial Transactivators" April, 2008.
159 University of California, San Francisco, SF,CA "Immunobiomarker discovery using peptoid microarrays" April, 2008.
160 University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" April, 2008.
161 American Association of Clinical Chemistry: Proteomics Sub-Division Meeting, Seattle, WA "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" May, 2008.
162 British Society for Proteomics Research Annual Meeting, Cambridge, UK "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" July, 2008.
163 Scripps Florida Research Institute, Jupiter, FL "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" August, 2008.
164 American Chemical Society, Eli Lilly Award Symposium, Philadelphia, PA "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" August, 2008.
165 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" October, 2008.
166 Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA "Intersections between eukaryotic transcription and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway" November, 2008.
167 Millenium Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, MA "Intersections between eukaryotic transcription and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway" November, 2008.
168 University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" February, 2009.
169 University of Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" February, 2009.
170 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" May, 2009.
171 University of Chicago, Chicago, IL "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" May, 2009.
172 National Institutes of Drug Addiction Symposium on Chemical Genetics, Portland, OR "Target-oriented chemical screening" July, 2009.
173 IUPAC Meeting, Glasgow, Scotland, UK "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" August, 2009.
174 NY Academy of Sciences, NY, NY "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" September, 2009.
175 Moffett Cancer Center, Tampa, FL "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" September, 2009.
176 NHLBI Capstone Symposium on Proteomic Technologies, Bethesda, MD "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" September, 2009.
177 University of Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN "Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the proteome" November, 2009.
178 Scrips Research Institute, La Jolla, CA “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system”, April 2010
179 Retts Syndrome Society Annual Meeting, NY,NY “Synthetic transcription factors”, May, 2010.
180 National Institute of General Medical Sciences Council Meeting, Bethesda, MD “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system”, May, 2010.
181 Fidelity Biosceinces Foundation Annual Meeting, Bar Harbor, ME “Development of a blood test for Alzheimer’s Disease”. August, 2010.
182 Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system”.  October 2010.
183 Beckman Symposium on Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA  “Unbiased discovery of IgG antibody biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease”.  October, 2010.
184 Keynote Lecture, Gates Foundation Grand Challenges Meeting, Seattle, WA “Unbiased discovery of IgG antibody biomarkers”.  October, 2010.
185 Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN “Rethinking screening”.  November, 2010.
186 Myelin Repair Foundation Annual Meeting, SF,CA “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system” January, 2011.
187 University of Florida, Gainsville, FL “Rethinking screening”.  January 2011.
188 Burnham Institute, Orlando, FL “Rethinking screening” May, 2011.
189 Gene Center, Munich, Germany “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. June, 2011.
190 Sanofi-Aventis, Frankfurt, Germany “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” June, 2011.
191 Torrey Pines Research Institute, St. Lucie, FL “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” August, 2011.
192 NIH Director’s Pioneer Award Symposium, Bethesda, MD “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. September, 2011.
193 University of Maryland, College Park, MD. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” September, 2011.
194 Scripps Research Institute 50th Anniversary Symposium, La Jolla, CA “Chemical methods to monitor and manipulate the immune system”. October, 2011.
195 Bristol-Myers-Squibb, Princeton, NJ. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” October, 2011.
196 University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” October, 2011.
197 Duke University, Durham, NC. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” November, 2011.
198 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” November, 2011.
199 University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Immunology of Vaccines Symposium, Pittsburgh, PA. “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. November, 2011.
200 Gates Foundation Symposium on Novel Advances in the Diagnosis of TB, Frankfurt, Germany. “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. January, 2012.
201 Adler Neuroscience Symposium, Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA. “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. February, 2012.
202 NHLBI Proteomics Program Bi-Annual Investigator’s Meeting, San Antonio, TX. “Second generation oligomer libraries as a source of bioactive compounds”. February 2012
203 EDRN Steering Committee of the NCI, Tempe, AZ.  “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. March, 2012.
204 Wayne State University, Detroit, MI.  “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. April, 2012.
205 Emory University Medical Center, Atlanta, GA.  “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. May, 2012.
206 Gladstone Institute, UCSF, San Francisco, CA. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” June, 2012.
207 Gordon Conference on Bioorganic Chemistry, Andover, NH. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” June, 2012.
208 Alzheimer Association International Conference, Vancouver, Canada.  “Development of a blood test for Alzheimer’s disease based on antigen surrogate technology” July, 2012.
209 University of Indiana, Bloomington, IN. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”.  September, 2012.
210 Howard Hughes Medical Institute for TB and AIDS Grand Opening, Durban, South Africa. “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. October, 2012.
211 SLAS National Conference, Orlando, FL. “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. January, 2013 (Session Chair).
212 University of Kansas, Lawrence, KA. “Unbiased discovery of antibody biomarkers”. February, 2013”.
213 Gladstone Institute Symposium on Neurodegeneerative Diseases, SF, CA. “Discovery of antibody biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease and neuromyelitis optica”, March, 2013.
214 Gladstone Institute Symposium on Neurodegeneerative Diseases, SF, CA. “Discovery of antibody biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease and neuromyelitis optica”, March, 2013.
215 American Peptide Society Symposium, Big Island, HI. “Conformatinally constrained oligomers as a rich source of protein ligands”. June, 2013.
216 Zing Conference on Medicinal Chemistry, Napa Valley, CA. “Rapid identification of highly selective protein ligands”.  July, 2013.
217 Keynote speaker at the Univeriversity of Illinois Chemical Biology Symposium (Graduate student training program) Champagne-Urbana, IL. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. September, 2013.
218 Symposium on Harnessing the Immune System With Small Molecular to Treat Chronic Disease, ACS Natl. Meeting, Indianapolis, IN. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”.  September, 2013.
219 University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”.  October, 2013.
220 National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome” December, 2013.
221 Alzheimer’s Drug Development Foundation Symposium, Miami Beach, FL.  “Rapid discovery and maturation of enzyme inhibitors”.  December, 2013.
222 Simon’s Foundation, NY, NY. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. June, 2014.
223 University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. November, 2014.
224 University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”.  November, 2014.
225 The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA.  “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. January, 2015.
226 Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO. “DNA-encoded one bead one compound libraries”. February, 2015.
227 Takeda Pharmaceuticals, Deerfield, IL. “Application of DNA-encoded library technology to tracking immune responses”. April, 2015.
228 The Economic Council of Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, FL. “Building a biotech industry in Palm Beach County: Obstacles and Opportunities”. June, 2015.
229 University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. September, 2015.
230 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. October, 2015.
231 PacificChem, Honolulu, HI. “Application of antigen surrogate technology for tracking adaptive immune responses”. December, 2015.
232 Peptides Gordon Research Conference, Ventura, CA “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system” February, 2016.
233 Albert Einstein School of Medicine, NY, NY.  “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system”.  April, 2016.
234 CHI Conference on Macrocycles, San Diego, CA.  “DNA-encoded libraries of macrocycles”. April, 2016.
235 Rochester University.  Rochester, NY.  Keynote seminar at graduate program retreat. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”.  May, 2016.
236 Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system”. May, 2016.
237 Novartis, Emeryville, CA. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. May, 2016.
238 American Chemical Society Meeting, Philadelphia, PA.  Cope Scholar Award Address. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system”. August, 2016.
239 Scripps Graduate Program Retreat, Lake Arrowhead, CA.  Keynote lecture. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”.  October, 2016.
240 Conference on Precision Medicine, Kingston, Jamaica. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system”. November, 2016.
241 DARPA Fold Fx Conference, La Jolla, CA.  “Synthesis and applications of bead-displayed DNA-encoded libraries”. December, 2016.
242 Keystone Meeting on “Omics” Strategies to Study the Proteome, Breckenridge, CO. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system”. January, 2017.
243 CHI Conference on Peptide Therapeutics, Boston, MA. “Synthesis and screening of DNA-encoded libraries of peptidomimetic compounds”. March, 2017.
244 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. ““Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system”. May, 2017.
245 St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, Memphis, TN “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. Sept. 2017.
246 NIDDK, Bethesda, MD. “Discovery of novel autoantigens in Type 1 Diabetes”. Oct. 2017.
247 2018 Latin American Chemistry congress, Havana, Cuba “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the immune system” (Keynote speaker), Jan. 2018.
248 Keystone meeting on Ubiquitin Signaling, Lake Tahoe, CA. “Development of selective inhibitors of the deubiquitylase Uch37”. Jan. 2018.
249 UCSF, SF, CA. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. March, 2018.
250 University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. March, 2018.
251 CHI Symposium on peptide and macrocyclic drugs, San Diego, CA. “DNA-encoded libraries of novel, cell permeable macrocycles”. April 2018.
252 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. April, 2018.
253 Chemistry and Biology of Foldamers meeting, NY, NY. “Isolation of bioactive foldamers from bead-displayed combinatorial libraries”. June 2018.ACS Southeast Regional Meeting, Augusta, GA. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. November, 2018.
254 University of Delaware, Newark, DE. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”. November, 2018.
255 International Peptide Symposium, Kyoto, Japan. “Novel inhibitors of Rpn13 and Uch37, exceptionally promising targets for cancer chemotherapy”. December, 2018.
256 Tufts University, Boston, MA. “Chemical tools to monitor and manipulate the proteome”.Feb. 2019.