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2016-2017 IMS Lecture Series Schedule

Lectures are held Thursdays @ 4:00 - 5:00 pm in The Committee Lecture Hall of the Molecular Biology Building at The Scripps Research Institute in California, unless otherwise noted. All lectures will be followed by a reception in the Skaggs Atrium, where all attendees may interact with our guests.

Faculty will have the opportunity to meet with speakers over the course of the day and a small number of students and fellows will be able to join the speaker in an informal lunch. 

Scripps students and fellows can reserve a space for lunch with the speaker by emailing Ivy Chester.

 

2016 Schedule

Eric J. Topol, M.D.

The Scripps Research Institute

Director, Scripps Translational Science Institute 

"Towards Individualized Medicine"

Abstract: That each of us is truly biologically unique, extending to even monozygotic, "identical" twins, is not fully appreciated. Now that it is possible to perform a comprehensive "omic" assessment of an individual, including one's DNA and RNA sequence and at least some characterization of one's proteome, metabolome, microbiome, autoantibodies, and epigenome, it has become abundantly clear that each of us has truly one-of-a-kind biological content. Well beyond the allure of the matchless fingerprint or snowflake concept, these singular, individual data and information set up a remarkable and unprecedented opportunity to improve medical treatment and develop preventive strategies to preserve health.

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09/15/16

Ganes Sen, Ph. D.

Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute

Department of Immunology

"Novel Observations on Intracellular Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling"

Abstract: Innate immune response to microbial infections is triggered by the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize not only microbial products but also host damage-associated molecular patterns. Our research focuses on the intracellular nucleic acid recognizing PRRs: how they signal and how specific proteins induced by them, impair virus replication and tumor growth. Signaling by the cytoplasmic RLRs activates IRF3, which in turn, induces many antiviral proteins; one such protein, Ifit2, protects mice from neuropathy caused by the rhabdovirus, VSV. RLR signaling can also activate IRF3 by a different pathway, called RIPA, which causes apoptosis of the infected cells; both RIPA and the antiviral proteins protect the host from viral pathogenesis. Another important family of PRRs constitutes the endosomal membrane-bound TLRs, such as TLR3 and TLR9. We observed that receptor tyrosine phosphorylation triggers their signaling and the tyrosine kinase activity of the EGF receptor is essential for the process. Consequently, EGFR inhibitors that are commonly used in cancer therapy, block signaling by TLR3 and TLR9 both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, STING is an ER-bound receptor for cyclic di-nucleotides, produced in response to cytoplasmic DNA. Recently, we made the surprising observation that, TRIF, the adaptor for TLR3 and TLR4, is essential for STING signaling. TRIF promotes STING dimerization and membrane translocation, by directly interacting with STING. As a consequence, like STING-/- mice, TRIF-/- mice are susceptible to HSV-1 pathogenesis. The above observations revealed avenues of possible cross-talks between unrelated signaling pathways, such as, EGFR and TLR or TLR and STING pathways.

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09/29/16

Pamela J. Bjorkman, Ph. D.

Cal Tech

Division of Biology and Biological Engineering

"A Molecular Arms Race: The Immune System Versus HIV"

Abstract: Over 30 years after the emergence of HIV, there is no effective vaccine, and AIDS remains a threat to global public health. Following HIV infection, the human immune response is unable to clear the virus, partly because the virus rapidly mutates to evade antibodies, one of our most important defenses against pathogens. In the absence of treatment with anti-retroviral drugs (unfortunately not readily available in the developing world), an HIV-infected person’s immune system gradually collapses and he/she cannot fight off normally innocuous pathogens in the environment. Antibodies, which we readily produce against other viruses, don’t work well against HIV. We hypothesize this is partly because antibody arms, which can both normally “hang on” to a virus until it is destroyed, don’t have the right dimensions to stay attached to HIV. We seek to alter natural antibodies using molecular engineering so that HIV is powerless to mutate against them. One engineering project involves designing and creating new antibody architectures with arms that can remain attached to HIV even as it mutates. We also engineer the antibody combining site by using chemical principles to improve the interface between antibodies bound to HIV proteins, starting with experimentally-determined three-dimensional structures of antibody/HIV complexes, and using bioinformatics to predict common pathways of HIV escape. The goal is to create potent antibody reagents that can be delivered to prevent or treat HIV/AIDS.

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10/06/16

La Jolla Immunology Conference @ The Salk Institute 

October 11-13, 2016

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10/11/16

John Boothroyd, Ph. D.

Stanford University School of Medicine

Department of Microbiology and Immunology

“The Challenge of Living in a Bubble: How the Intracellular Parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, Communicates with its Host from Inside a Parasitophorous Vacuole.”

Abstract: Infectious agents that reproduce only inside a host cell face very special challenges. On the one hand, they grow within an environment that is rich in all the essentials of life; on the other hand, such environments are often fiercely protected by a myriad of host defenses. Toxoplasma gondii is a eukaryotic, single-celled “parasite” that infects an extraordinarily broad range of cell types in an equally broad range of mammalian and avian host species. In this talk, I will explore how Toxoplasma communicates with these different hosts and host cell types, deploying a range of effectors that mediate the interaction.

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11/03/16

Erica Ollmann Saphire, Ph. D.

Faculty Lecure Series 

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11/09/16

Carolina B. Lopez, Ph. D. 

University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine

Department of Pathobiology

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11/17/16

Elina Zuniga, Ph. D.

University of California, San Diego

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12/01/16

Gwendalyn J. Randolph, Ph. D.

Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

Division of Immunology

"Lymphatic Transport and Inflammation"

Abstract: TBA

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12/08/16

Stefan Kunz, Ph. D.

Lausanne University Hospital

Institute of Microbiology

"Novel Strategies to Combat Pathogenic Arenaviruses"

Abstract: TBA

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12/15/16

2017 Schedule



Sara Sawyer, Ph. D. 

University of Colorado Boulder

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01/12/17

Barney Graham, M.D., Ph. D.

National Institute of Health, Vaccine Research Center

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01/19/17

Marie Pancera, Ph. D.

The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

01/26/17

Robert Seder, M.D.

Cellular Immunology, Vaccine Research Center

National Institutes of Health 

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02/02/17

Bernard Fields Lecture:

Elliot Kief, Ph. D.

Harvard Medical School Departments of Microbiology and Immunobiology

Dorian McGavern, Ph. D.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

02/07/17

Richard Flavell, Ph. D. FRS

Yale School of Medicine

Department of Immunobiology

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02/16/17

Frank Dixon Lecture: 

Klaus Rajewsky, Ph. D. 

Max Delbruck Center for Molecule Medicine 

02/23/17

Ye Zhang, Ph. D.

Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Nomis Foundation Laboratories for Immunobiology and Microbial Pathogenesis

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03/02/17

Scott C. Weaver, Ph. D.

University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston National Laboratory 

Institute for Human Infections and Immunity

Departments of Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology

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03/09/17

Marc K. Jenkins, Ph. D.

University of Minnesota

Department of Microbiology and Immunology

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03/16/17

Robert F. Garry, Ph. D.

Tulane University School of Medicine

Department of Microbiology & Immunology

"An Outbreak of Ebola in the Lassa Fever Zone"

Abstract: TBA

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03/30/17

Diane Mathis, Ph. D.

Harvard Medical School

Immunology, Department of Immunobiology and Microbiology

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04/06/17

Donna Farber, Ph. D.

Columbia University Medical Center

Department of Microbiology and Immunology 

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04/13/17

George M. Shaw, M.D., Ph.D.

Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania 

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04/20/17

Nancy L. Haigwood, Ph. D.

Oregon Health & Science University 

Oregon National Primate Research Center

"Antibodies as New Therapies for HIV"

Abstract: TBA

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04/27/17

Marco Colonna, Ph. D.

Washington University School of Medicine

Department of Pathology and Immunology

"Innate Lymphoid Cells in Immunity"

Abstract: TBA

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05/11/17

Mary Estes, Ph. D.

Baylor College of Medicine

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05/18/17

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