Scripps Research Logo

John Yates III, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Chemical Physiology
California Campus
Laboratory Website
jyates@scripps.edu
(858) 784-8862

Scripps Research Joint Appointments

Department of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience
Faculty, Graduate Program

Research Focus

Genomic and EST sequencing projects are providing a sequence infrastructure that is changing how protein biochemistry is practiced. These data along with mass spectrometry provide the cornerstone technologies fueling the proteomics revolution. Our group is focused on developing tools and strategies in proteomics to answer basic biological questions. By coupling the additional amino acid sequence information that can be obtained using peptide tandem mass spectrometry to "back-end" database searching and "front-end" separative techniques, we are able to directly analyze extremely complex protein mixtures. The applications for these technologies vary from analyzing purified protein complexes to studying host-pathogen interactions in diseases such as malaria or anthrax. We are further extending these applications to find post-translational modifications to the proteins within these same complex mixtures.

Education

M.S., Chemistry, University of Maine, 1983
Ph.D., Chemistry, University of Virginia, 1987
B.A., Zoology, University of Maine, 1980

Awards & Professional Activities

Associate Editor, Analytical Chemistry Board of Reviewing Editors Science Biemann Award 2004 American Society for Mass Spectrometry Research Award 1996 Pehr Edman Award 1998

Selected References

Skop, A. R., Liu, H., Yates, J. R., Meyer, B. J., Heald, R. Functional proteomic analysis of the mammalian midbody reveals conserved cell division components, Science 305, 61-6. 2004

Eric C. Schrimer, Laurence Florens, Tinglu Guan, John R. Yates III, and Larry Gerace Novel Membrane Proteins With Potential Disease Links Found By Subtractive Proteomics, Science 301, 1380-1382. 2003

Christine C. Wu, Michael J. MacCoss, Kathryn E. Howell, John R. Yates, III A novel method for the comprehensive proteomic analysis of membrane proteins: Identification, Modifications, and Topology, Nature Biotechnology 21, 262-7. 2003

Boddy, M.N., Gaillard, P.H.L., McDonald, W.H., Shanahan, P., Yates, J.R., 3rd, Russell, P. Mus81-Eme1 are essential components of a Holliday junction resolvase. Cell 107, 537-548. 2001

Links

Scientists Identify Thousands of Proteins Associated with the Deadliest Form of Malaria