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News Release Archives

1987 - 2015

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  • December 22, 2008
    New Technique is Quantum Leap Forward in Understanding Proteins
    Proteins drive critical functioning in the cells of everything from bacteria to humans. But deciphering genomic data to discover just how the thousands upon thousands of proteins in a given organism interact has emerged as one of the most confounding biological challenges of the new century. In this ongoing quest, a group of Scripps Research Institute scientists, along with colleagues from the University of California, San Diego, (UCSD) have borrowed from physics to deliver one of those research rarities—an unmitigated success. The group has devised a computational method that, with remarkable accuracy, predicts how bacterial proteins fold and interact.

  • December 18, 2008
    Team Led by Scripps Research Scientists Develop Method for Generating Novel Types of Stem Cells
    A team led by Scripps Research Institute scientists has for the first time developed a technique for generating novel types of rat and human stem cells with characteristics similar to mouse embryonic stem cells, currently the predominant type of stem cells used for creating animal models of human diseases in research. The technique potentially provides scientists with new sources of stem cells to develop drugs and treatments for human diseases.

  • December 11, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Watch Membrane Fission in Real Time, Identifying a Cellular Fission Machine
    Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have solved one of biology’s neatest little tricks: they have discovered how a cell’s outer membrane pinches a little pouch from itself to bring molecules outside the cell inside—without making holes that leak fluid from either side of the membrane.

  • November 24, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Shed Light on How DNA Is Unwound So That Its Code Can Be Read
    Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have figured out how a macromolecular machine is able to unwind the long and twisted tangles of DNA within a cell’s nucleus so that genetic information can be "read" and used to direct the synthesis of proteins, which have many specific functions in the body.

  • November 21, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Identify Blood Component that Turns Bacteria Virulent
    Scientists from the Scripps Research Institute have discovered the key chemical that signals Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax, to become lethal. This finding opens up new avenues of exploration for the development of treatments for bacterial infections.

  • November 16, 2008
    Scripps Research and New York University Scientists Discover New Cause of Fatal Brain Injury from Acute Viral Meningitis
    What was once thought to be the culprit responsible for fatal brain damage in acute viral meningitis has now been found to be only an accomplice, say researchers at The Scripps Research Institute and New York University.

  • November 14 , 2008
    San Diego Philanthropist John Moores Gives $2.1 Million to Scripps Research Institute
    San Diego philanthropist, businessman, and community leader John J. Moores has contributed the first gift of $2.1 million to The Scripps Research Institute’s new $50 million initiative to recruit new world-class researchers and sustain and expand the work of current scientists at the renowned La Jolla- and Florida-based biomedical organization, the Institute announced.

  • November 10, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Uncover New Mechanism Closely Linked to Neurodegeneration and Alzheimer’s
    Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered a novel mechanism that may play a significant role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease and a host of other neurodegenerative conditions. The discovery of this mechanism points towards potential new targets that could lead to treatments to enhance neuron survival.

  • November 5, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Identify Exciting New Compounds for Stem Cell Production from Adult Cells
    Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have identified a combination of small molecules that significantly improve the reprogramming of general adult cells into pluripotent stem cells, which can then develop into all cell types.

  • October 27, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Develop A New Strategy to Fight Obesity
    Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a catalytic antibody that degrades a known appetite stimulant. The antibody works against the gastric hormone ghrelin, which has been linked to weight gain and fat storage through its metabolic actions. These findings point towards a potentially novel treatment for obesity that would interfere directly with the some of the biological mechanisms determining weight.

  • October 23, 2008
    Pioneering Neuroscientist Hollis T. Cline Joins The Scripps Research Institute
    The Scripps Research Institute has announced the appointment of innovator and neuroscientist Hollis "Holly" T. Cline, Ph.D., as professor in the institute’s Departments of Cell Biology and Chemical Physiology.

  • October 21, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Enhance Immune System Attacks on Cancer
    Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have tweaked, prodded, and pushed immune system cells into successfully attacking tumors in laboratory and animal studies. They say their new strategy could prove to be safer than some treatments now being used to stimulate cancer immunity in humans.

  • October 17, 2008
    Scripps Research Team Sheds Light on Immune System Suppression
    Diseases such as HIV, tuberculosis, and measles claim countless lives by weakening immune systems in ways that have remained unclear. But a team from The Scripps Research Institute has for the first time pinpointed a clear mechanism for immunosuppression. They have shown how an initial viral infection can block production of critical immune system proteins known as type I interferons, leading to susceptibility to other, potentially deadly infections.

  • October 12, 2008
    Team Led by Scripps Research Scientists Uncovers New Way to Limit Damaging Production of Nitric Oxide
    Excess nitric oxide production by one enzyme has been tied to human illnesses ranging from inflammation to cancer, but adequate treatments for the problem have been elusive. Now, work led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has revealed a new method for chemically targeting this single enzyme to block troubling nitric oxide production, without limiting its beneficial production by other closely related enzymes.

  • October 8, 2008
    Scripps Research Team Solves Structure of "Beneficial" Virus
    Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have, for the first time, solved the structure of a virus that can infect specific cancer cells. This new knowledge may help drug designers tweak the pathogen enough so that it can attack other tumor subtypes.

  • October 3, 2008
    Study Unveils Structural Details of Enzyme Vital to DNA Repair
    Working in close collaboration, two groups of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have revealed for the first time details of the crucial role played by the enzyme Mre11 in DNA repair, a process critical to cell survival and good health.

  • October 2, 2008
    Scientists Define Structure of Important Neurological Receptor, Establishing a Platform to Understand G Protein-Coupled Receptors
    Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have determined the structure of an adenosine receptor that plays a critical role in a number of important physiological processes including pain, breathing, and heart function. The findings could lead to the development of a new class of therapeutics for treating numerous neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s and Huntington disease.

  • October 1, 2008
    The Scripps Research Institute and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative Launch World’s First Dedicated HIV Neutralizing Antibody Center
    The Scripps Research Institute and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), the world’s only global non-profit organization focused solely on AIDS vaccine development, announced the establishment of a new research center dedicated exclusively to solving the most pressing challenge facing AIDS vaccine researchers today.

  • September 15, 2008
    Team Led by Scripps Research Scientists Finds Gene Critical to Normal Hearing
    Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a new gene they say is essential for both hearing and balance in mice and humans. They found that a mutation in this gene causes a form of deafness that has nothing to do with structural proteins in the inner ear—commonly altered in hereditary deafness. On the contrary, the mutation affects an enzyme with a known catalytic function, which gives hints as to how the problem might be preventable with novel drug therapy.

  • September 15, 2008
    Scripps Research Team Reverses Huntington’s Disease Symptoms in Mice
    There is no cure for Huntington’s disease, or even treatments that can reverse or slow progression of the devastating movement deficits and cognitive dysfunction that occur with the condition. But, now, an agent developed by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has shown dramatic therapeutic efficacy in experimental mice, and did so with minimal toxicity.

  • September 9, 2008
    Scripps Research Study Topples the One Drug-One Disease Paradigm for Combating Protein-Folding Diseases
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that a single small molecule may be effective in treating multiple protein-folding diseases, breaking the one drug-one disease approach that has guided the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries for so many years.

  • August 25, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Find Gene Expression Profile Shared by Pluripotent Stem Cells
    An international team of researchers led by Professor Jeanne Loring, Ph.D., of The Scripps Research Institute has developed a novel method to identify pluripotent stem cells--cells that can differentiate into multiple distinct cell types. These pluripotent cells hold great promise for drug development and treatment of many devastating disorders.

  • August 21, 2008
    New Protein Survey by Scripps Research Scientists Upends Understanding of Cell Death Process
    Results from a Scripps Research Institute study have nearly tripled the number of proteins known to be involved in the critical process of programmed cell death, and have shot down a long-held idea about the life cycle of proteins. The work opens doors for potential new drug discoveries, and may open countless more as the new technique that enabled the work, dubbed the PROTOMAP, is applied to studies of other cellular functions.

  • August 8, 2008
    New Scripps Research Study Solves Structural Mystery of Cellular Protein Transport
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have determined the structure of the protective protein coat surrounding intracellular vesicles or sacs that are needed to transport proteins out of the cell. Understanding this structure could shed critically needed light on many loss-of-function diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity and cystic fibrosis and lead to potential new therapies.

  • August 7, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Find Modified Protein Containing an Unnatural Amino Acid that Breaks Immune Tolerance
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have produced a powerful immune response in mice by incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a target protein. This novel approach could prove useful in the development of new vaccines for cancer, infectious diseases, and other disorders.

  • August 6, 2008
    Scripps Research Team Unravels New Cellular Repair Mechanism
    A Scripps Research team has unraveled a new biochemical pathway that triggers a critical repair response to correct errors in the DNA replication process that could otherwise lead to harmful or fatal mutations in cells.

  • July 9, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Reveal Key Structure from Ebola Virus
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have determined the structure of a critical protein from the Ebola virus, which, though rare, is one of the deadliest viruses on the planet killing between 50 and 90 percent of those infected.

  • June 27, 2008
    Scripps Research Study of Disease-Causing Mutations Uncovers Surprising Pattern
    A new Scripps Research Institute survey of genetic mutations definitively tied to diseases has revealed clustering in a specific region of an important class of enzymes. The pattern was so clear it suggests that other mutations contributing to a wide range of diseases are likely to be tied to the region. New searches focused there may therefore lead to a wealth of new targets for drug treatments.

  • June 24, 2008
    Business Executive Amin J. Khoury Elected To Scripps Research Institute Board Of Trustees
    International business leader and entrepreneur Amin J. Khoury has been elected to the Board of Trustees of The Scripps Research Institute, a world leader in biomedical science with laboratories in La Jolla, California, and Palm Beach County, Florida.

  • June 19, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Find Pathogen Uses Unique Strategy to Inhibit Human Immune Response
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered a unique strategy used by some common bacteria to disrupt the human immune system, maintaining persistent infections and ensuring the bacteria’s survival.

  • June 10, 2008
    Research Unveils New Stabilizing and Signaling Properties of Cholesterol in Key Human Receptors
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have structurally shown for the first time that cholesterol acts as a stabilizing factor for an important family of cell receptors.

  • June 4, 2008
    Researchers Discover Synthetic Chemicals that Create Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Cells
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute report that they have significantly improved upon a revolutionary technique that uses genes to turn skin cells from an adult back into pluripotent stem cells.

  • May 29, 2008
    NIH awards $20 million CTSA grant to Scripps Translational Science Institute
    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today that Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) is one of 14 research centers to receive a highly competitive $20 million Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) this year. STSI, led by Eric J. Topol, M.D., is a collaborative program between The Scripps Research Institute and Scripps Health, partnering with a number of institutions in San Diego.

  • May 29, 2008
    Scripps Research Crystal Structure Reveals Mystery Behind Three Rare Childhood Disorders
    Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have figured out how it is that tiny mutations in a single gene can produce three strikingly different childhood diseases—disorders that increase cancer risk thousands of times in some young patients and premature aging or a complete failure to develop in others. Investigators say that knowing more about the mechanisms of these diseases may provide insights into how therapeutic drugs can be designed.

  • May 27, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Find Seizure Drug Reverses Cellular Effects of Alcohol Addiction in Models
    New findings from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute provide evidence that the drug gabapentin affects certain components of the alcohol addiction cycle in the brain, supporting the idea that the medication, which is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating seizures and pain, also holds potential for the treatment of alcohol dependence.

  • May 20, 2008
    Scripps Research Institute Awarded Patent for Remarkable Chemical Technology
    The Scripps Research Institute has been awarded U.S. Patent No. US 7,375,234 B2, which covers a broad class of chemical reactions that mimic biological efficiency and opens the door to a new world of chemistry. The patent’s diverse potential applications include the development of new drugs, bioactive nanomaterials, anti-bacterial and non-immunogenic coatings for medical implants, coatings for semiconductors, coatings and adhesives for ships’ hulls, self-healing materials, microelectronics and responsive nanomaterials, and surface-sensitive adhesives, to name a few.

  • May 15, 2008
    Scripps Research Team Devises Innovative Method to Produce Highly Sought-After Drug
    A team of Scripps Research Institute scientists has developed an inexpensive and in many ways astonishing new method for economically producing a promising pharmaceutical steroid. The molecule, called cortistatin A, which was isolated in 2006 from a marine sponge discovered over 100 years ago, has shown huge promise for treating conditions ranging from macular degeneration to cancer.

  • May 7, 2008
    New International Agreement Advances Scripps Research Study of Alcoholism
    The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, and the Institut de Génétique et Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC) in Strasbourg, France, have entered into an agreement that aims to advance research on the biological basis of alcohol abuse. The research may uncover keys to vulnerability to alcoholism and help to develop new approaches for treating the condition.

  • May 1, 2008
    Scripps Research Study Identifies Protein Critical for Iron Absorption
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have pinpointed an important protein that is essential for the normal absorption of iron in the body. The discovery could lead to novel therapies to block anemia during chronic diseases or to treat hemochromatosis, a genetic disease caused by an overabundance of iron.

  • April 29, 2008
    Three Scripps Research Scientists Elected to National Academy of Sciences
    Three members of The Scripps Research Institute faculty have been elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, it was announced today. Scripps Research is the only independent research institution in the nation to have three faculty members chosen this year.

  • April 14, 2008
    Scientists Create First Successful Libraries of Avian Flu Virus Antibodies
    An international group of American and Turkish research scientists, led by Sea Lane Biotechnologies, has created the first comprehensive monoclonal antibody libraries against avian influenza (H5N1) using samples from survivors of the 2005/2006 "bird flu" outbreak in Turkey. These antibody libraries hold the promise for developing a therapy that could stop a pandemic in its tracks and provide treatment to those infected, as well as potentially pointing the way towards the development of a universal flu vaccine. The expanded treatment and containment options offered by Sea Lane’s antibody libraries could help provide healthcare officials, researchers, and governments with unprecedented resources to combat this serious global health threat.

  • April 11, 2008
    New Scripps Research Study Finds T Cell Multiplication Unexpectedly Delayed After Infection
    In a surprising outcome that overturns the conventional wisdom on the body’s immune response to infection, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have shown that T cells do not begin proliferation until up to three days after infection.

  • April 10, 2008
    Small RNAs May Play Big Role in Embryonic Stem Cells
    An international team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has used a new method to discover an unusual molecular signature in human embryonic stem cells that may lead to development of new cell-based therapeutics.

  • April 8, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Automate Molecular Evolution
    Under the control of a computer at The Scripps Research Institute, a population of billions of genes morphed through 500 cycles of forced adaptation to emerge as molecules that could grow faster and faster on a continually dwindling source of chemical fuel—a feat that researchers describe as an example of "Darwinian evolution on a chip."

  • March 26, 2008
    Renowned Stem Cell Researcher Jeanne F. Loring Heads New Center at The Scripps Research Institute
    Professor Jeanne F. Loring, Ph.D., has been named founding director of the newly created Center for Regenerative Medicine at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California.

  • March 14, 2008
    Scripps Research Team Wins $4 Million Grant to Study Effects of Chronic Marijuana Use
    A group of investigators led by The Scripps Research Institute’s Professor Barbara Mason has won a $4 million grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the effects of chronic marijuana use, including influence on brain function and the consequences of withdrawal.

  • March 10, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Identify Potential New Target for Treating Metastatic Cancer
    A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a human protein that may be a new target for future cancer therapies. By experimentally blocking the action of this protein, called CD151, the team showed they could stop cancer cells from metastasizing, or spreading from one tumor to establish new tumors elsewhere.

  • February 28, 2008
    Bright Lights: Mystery of Glowing Antibody Solved by Scripps Research Scientists
    A chance discovery of a uniquely luminescent monoclonal antibody nearly ten years ago has proven to be far more interesting—and far more tenacious—than anyone might have suspected. Now, a group of Scripps Research scientists have shown that EP2-19G2, one of a panel of fluorescent monoclonal antibodies that were first reported in 2000, produces its distinctive bright blue glow through a rare and highly complex recombination of electrical charge.

  • February 27, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Devise Approach that Stops HIV at Earliest Stage of Infection
    Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a new two-punch strategy against HIV and they have already successfully tested aspects of it in the laboratory.

  • February 27, 2008
    Scripps Research Institute Scientists Studying Sepsis in Mice Find Potential Drug Targets for Deadly Disease
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered a connection between blood coagulation and the immune system that may have important implications for people with sepsis, a severe and difficult to treat disease that kills tens of thousands of Americans a year.

  • February 21, 2008
    Scripps Research Study Uncovers New Mechanism of Long-Term Memory Formation
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified specific features of neurons that are critical components of the learning process and the development of long-term memory.

  • February 13, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Find Protein May Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute report that a protein capable of producing what has been called "Alzheimer’s of the heart" has been found to protect against development of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain in rodent models.

  • February 8, 2008
    In Memoriam: Frank J. Dixon, 1920-2008
    Frank J. Dixon, pioneering immunologist and founder of The Scripps Research Institute, died in San Diego, California, on Friday, February 08, 2008. He was 87.

  • February 7, 2008
    Scripps Research Team Finds Genetic Mutation May Lead to Increased Autoimmunity
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that a mutation in a known DNA recombination mechanism may result in the onset of autoimmunity and an overexpression of autoreactive antibodies—molecules that attack the host—in animal models.

  • February 4, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Find That Calcium Channel Blockers Help Normalize Lysosomal Storage Disease Patient-Derived Cells
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that two widely available prescription drugs restore partial cellular folding, trafficking, and function to a variety of mutant enzymes responsible for three distinct lysosomal storage diseases, maladies involving multiple organ system failure.

  • January 23, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Discover New Gene Linked to Fragile X Syndrome
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a new gene involved in fragile X syndrome, a condition that often shares many symptoms of autism. The discovery may lead to new tests or treatments for several neurological disorders.

  • January 17, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Find New Genetic Mutation that Halts the Development of Lupus
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered a specific genetic mutation that suppresses the development of systemic lupus, an incurable autoimmune disease that causes the body to attack itself. The research suggests potential targets for future drug development.

  • January 16, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists: Naturally Occurring Peptide Inhibits Common Viral Infection
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that a naturally occurring peptide known for its antibacterial action can also inhibit viral infection.

  • January 3, 2008
    Renowned Immunologist Richard Ulevitch Retires from Scripps Research Institute
    The Scripps Research Institute today announced the retirement of Professor Richard Ulevitch, chairman of the Immunology Department and an internationally renowned researcher in the field of innate immunity.

  • January 2, 2008
    Scripps Research Scientists Discover Remarkable Editing System For Protein Production
    Even small mistakes made by cells during protein production can have profound disease effects, but the processes cells use to correct mistakes have been challenging to decipher. Recent work by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, however, has uncovered two surprising new methods for such editing. 
2007
  • December 20, 2007
    Scripps Research and St. Jude’s Team Finds a Widely Used Anti-Malarial Drug Prevents Cancer Development
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital have found that a commonly prescribed anti-malarial drug effectively prevents the development of certain types of human cancer in mouse models.

  • December 18, 2007
    Scripps Research Discovery Leads to Broad Potential Applications in CovX-Pfizer Deal
    A catalytic antibody discovery made at The Scripps Research Institute has formed the basis of the upcoming acquisition of biotechnology venture CovX by pharmaceutical giant Pfizer, Inc.

  • December 6, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists Discover Chemical Triggers for Aggression in Mice
    A group of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has discovered specific pheromone compounds responsible for eliciting aggressive behavior in mice. They have also identified the first step in the neurological pathway that triggers the aggressive response.

  • December 5, 2007
    Richard Lerner to Receive Research!America Advocacy Award
    Richard A. Lerner, MD, president of The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, has been named Research!America’s 2008 Builders of Science award recipient. He will accept the award at Research!America’s 12th Annual Advocacy Awards Gala on March 18, 2008, at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, DC.

  • December 5, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists Find White Blood Cells Deliver Boost to Tumors
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that a specific type of white blood cell carries with it an unusually potent catalyst of tumor growth. The catalyst promotes angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, which are critical to tumor growth.

  • November 14, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists Develop Modeling Method that Increases Our Understanding of Diseases like Cystic Fibrosis and Alzheimer’s
    A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has come up with a simple but comprehensive way of probing the parts of our biological machinery that controls protein folding, packaging, and export from our cells.

  • October 30, 2007
    Scripps Research Team Blocks Bacterial Communication System to Prevent Deadly Staph Infections
    In hopes of combating the growing scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, in particular drug-resistant staph bacteria, a team of scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has designed a new type of vaccine that could one day be used in humans to block the onset of infection. The advantage of the new vaccine is that it would work not only on current bacterial resistant stains but also would not induce the potential for new bacterial resistance because, rather than killing bacterial cells, it blocks their communication system, preventing the shift from harmless to virulent, thus allowing the body’s natural defenses to combat the bacteria.

  • October 30, 2007
    Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics Unveils Unique Markers for Childhood Disorders
    For the first time, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have applied untargeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomics to uncover a number of unique molecular markers in two inherited childhood metabolic disorders. This new method could prove useful in diagnosis and patient clinical evaluation.

  • October 26, 2007
    Scripps Research Wins $51 Million Contract to Study Critical Immune Response Mechanisms
    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a $51 million five-year contract to The Scripps Research Institute to study innate and adaptive immune responses to a number of pathogens, including the influenza virus. Richard Ulevitch, Scripps Research professor and chairman of the Department of Immunology, will lead the project as principal investigator.

  • October 25, 2007
    New Scripps Research Mass Spectrometry NanoTechnology Delivers Significant Advances
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a new mass spectrometry technology for studying small biomolecules. The new highly sensitive and robust technology, called Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS), enables the analysis of single cells, tissue imaging, and rapid blood and urine analysis with no advanced sample preparation.

  • October 11, 2007
    Novel Yeast Protein Plays a Key Role in Repairing Double-Strand DNA Breaks
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered a novel protein in yeast that plays a key role in controlling the repair of double-strand breaks in DNA. The discovery of the protein, Ctp1, and its role, strongly suggests that the same mechanism works in regulating DNA damage repair in human cells and may point the way to future cancer therapies.

  • October 4, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists Develop Innovative Dual Action Anthrax Vaccine-Antitoxin Combination
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and The Salk Institute for Biological Studies have developed a new and highly effective agent that provides protection against anthrax by combining a fast-acting anthrax toxin inhibitor with a vaccine in a single compound.

  • October 4, 2007
    New Pearson Family Chair at Scripps Research to Support Forward-Looking Alcohol and Addiction Research
    The Scripps Research Institute has announced that Professor Barbara Mason, Ph.D., has been appointed the first recipient of The Pearson Family Chair, a newly endowed position in alcohol and addiction research at the institute.

  • October 4, 2007
    Structure of HIV Capsid Protein Reveals Potential Weakness at Inner Core of Virus
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have published a detailed molecular model of the full-length HIV CA protein—a viral protein that forms a cone-shaped shell around the genome of HIV. This structure reveals a never-before-seen molecular interaction that may be a weakness at the core of the virus.

  • October 1, 2007
    Scripps Research Study Reveals Mechanism Behind Nicotine Dependency
    Many more people try to quit smoking than succeed in giving up this nicotine-delivering habit. Now, a group of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has identified one neurobiological mechanism that contributes to nicotine dependence, and to the anxiety and craving experienced upon withdrawal. The findings also suggest a new approach to developing drugs that could help smokers quit.

  • September 5, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists Shed New Light on How Antibodies Fight HIV
    Leading an international team of scientists, immunologists at The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered the first evidence that an HIV antibody is most effective when it binds not only to the virus, but also to host immune cells. The findings suggest that antibody efficiency depends on both directly neutralizing the virus and activating the host immune response.

  • September 5, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists Reveal Pivotal Hearing Structure
    A team of scientists made up of two laboratory groups from The Scripps Research Institute and one from the National Institutes of Health has shed light on how our bodies convert vibrations entering the ear into electrical signals that can be interpreted by the brain. Exactly how the electrical signal is generated has been the subject of ongoing research interest.

  • September 4, 2007
    Scripps Research Institute Scientist Bruce Beutler Awarded 2007 Balzan Prize
    Bruce Beutler, M.D., chair of the Genetics Department at the Scripps Research Institute, has been awarded the prestigious 2007 Balzan Prize for his work in innate immunit. He shares the $827,000 prize with Jules Hoffmann of the Academie des Sciences in Paris.

  • August 30, 2007
    New Study Pinpoints Specific Neurons Involved In Memory Formation
    In a remarkable new study, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have unlocked one of the secrets of how memory is formed. Working with a unique breed of transgenic mice, the new study has shown for the first time that the same neurons activated during fear conditioning are, in fact, reactivated during memory retrieval.

  • July 17, 2007
    New "Checkmate" Method from The Scripps Research Institute Provides Powerful New Tool for Preventing Spread of Future Epidemics
    Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have developed a breakthrough methodology that can be used to rapidly predict how viruses such as avian influenza H5N1, a dangerous strain of "bird flu," will mutate in response to attacks by the immune system. The new approach, dubbed "checkmate analysis," may also predict which antibodies or small molecule therapeutics will best neutralize these viral mutations before they can develop into global epidemics.

  • June 25, 2007
    Scripps Research Study Links Chronic Methamphetamine Abuse and Cardiovascular Disease
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that chronic abuse of the highly addictive drug methamphetamine may be an unrecognized risk factor in the development of a number of potentially serious cardiovascular disorders frequently reported by methamphetamine abusers.

  • June 20, 2007
    Scripps Research Institute President Richard A. Lerner Receives Honorary Degree from Oxford University
    Richard A. Lerner, M.D., president of The Scripps Research Institute, was recognized today with an honorary doctor of science degree from the University of Oxford for his innovative work as a chemist.

  • June 19, 2007
    Kristin Baldwin of Scripps Research Institute Named To Highly Selective Pew Scholars Program
    The Pew Charitable Trusts and the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) announced today that Kristin K. Baldwin, Ph.D., was named one of 20 exceptional researchers selected as 2007 Pew Scholars in the Biomedical Sciences. As a Pew Scholar, each scientist will receive a $240,000 award over four years to help support his or her research, as well as gain inclusion into a unique community of scientists that encourages collaboration and the exchange of ideas. The program is funded by Pew through a grant to UCSF.

  • June 19, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists Show Protein Accelerates Breast Cancer Progression in Animal Models
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have shown for the first time that a cytokine called pleiotrophin stimulates the progression of breast cancer in both animal and cell culture models. The study, which tested three separate models to determine the role of inappropriate expression of pleiotrophin, found that it produced striking increases in aggressiveness of the breast cancer cells themselves.

  • June 18, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists Discover Mouse Appetite Suppressant
    A protein called interleukin-18 (IL-18), previously known mainly for its role in the immune system, is also a powerful appetite suppressant for mice once they reach the equivalent of adulthood, according to scientists at The Scripps Research Institute. Members of the research team hope the work will eventually lead to the development of new treatments for preventing obesity in humans. Unlike similar proteins, IL-18 suppresses appetite without unwanted side effects such as fever or sickness behavior, suggesting it might be a particularly good target for further study.

  • May 29, 2007
    Scripps Research Institute Team Awarded $17 Million Grant to Develop Therapeutic Use of Adult Stem Cells to Treat Eye Diseases
    A group of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has been awarded a five-year, $17,037,185 grant from the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health. The grant, starting June 1, 2007, will support the development of the use of adult stem cells as a therapy for treating the most common types of vision loss.

  • May 23, 2007
    Study Reveals Process Linking Disordered Protein Folding and Binding
    A group of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology have uncovered one of the processes by which disordered or unstructured proteins become bound to specific cellular sites. The findings offer valuable insights into how proteins carry out their genetically encoded functions, and may provide promising new targets for future drug development.

  • May 3, 2007
    Study Led by Scripps Research Scientist Reveals Little-Known Cell Networks Vital to Circadian Rhythm
    In a wide-ranging systems biology study of circadian rhythm, a multi-institutional collaboration led by Scripps Research Institute Professor Steve Kay has uncovered some little-known cellular mechanisms for sustaining circadian rhythm and limiting the impact of genetic clock mutations in mammals. The new findings could have important implications for future circadian studies, and point researchers toward new ways to manipulate human circadian rhythm at the molecular level to treat diseases such as bipolar disorder.

  • May 2, 2007
    Scripps Research Team Sheds Light on Long-Sought Cold Sensation Gene
    Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the Novartis Research Foundation have shown that a gene called TRPM8 is responsible for the bulk of this ability in mice. The discovery, reported in the May 3 issue of the journal Neuron, might one day lead to the development of drugs that induce cold sensation as an analgesic, or block it to prevent certain forms of chronic pain associated with cold sensation.

  • April 10, 2007
    Scripps Research Team Unravels Drug Target for Parasitic Diseases
    The ongoing search for better treatments for devastating parasitic diseases such as Chagas’ disease and African sleeping sickness now has a new target, thanks to research by a team from The Scripps Research Institute. The group now understands better a critical DNA-protein binding event that, if blocked, can kill the parasites that cause the diseases. The researchers are already working to screen drugs that will block this mechanism.

  • April 9, 2007
    Study Shows Humans and Plants Share Common Regulatory Pathway
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have shown for the first time that humans and plants share a common pathogen recognition pathway as part of their innate immune systems. The data could help shed fresh light on how pathogen recognition proteins function and the role they play in certain chronic inflammatory diseases.

  • April 5, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists Identify New Regulatory Mechanism for Critical Protein Signaling Domain
    In a study with far-reaching implications, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and other institutions have for the first time identified a new in vivo regulatory mechanism for the PH Domain, a component of many proteins that allows them to move from a cell’s interior to the cell membrane in response to stimulation of cell surface receptors. The findings offer a promising avenue for the development of novel therapies for immunodeficiency or autoimmune diseases.

  • April 4, 2007
    Scripps Research Team Reveals Major Role for Novel Neurotransmitter System in Regulating Drug Intake
    A team of researchers at The Scripps Research Institute has provided strong new evidence that a novel neurotransmitter system in the brain is involved in alcohol and opiate addiction. The group found that levels of endogenous cannabinoids increase or decrease in direct proportion to the amount of alcohol or opiates consumed. By providing insight into possible new targets for drug therapy, this work opens up novel avenues for regulating addiction.

  • March 28, 2007
    Scripps Research Institute Presents Latest on Treatments for Cardiovascular Diseas, Stroke, Alzheimer’s, and Arthritis
    Three leading scientists at the Scripps Research Institute will give a free lecture titled "Current Research and Developing New Treatments for Cardiovascular Disease, Stroke, Alzheimer’s, and Arthritis—On the Front Lines of Hope," Wednesday evening, April 25 in La Jolla.

  • March 19, 2007
    Synthetic Production of Potential Pharmaceuticals Dramatically Simplified by Scripps Research Team
    A team of researchers at The Scripps Research Institute has developed new techniques that dramatically reduce the time, complexity, and cost of synthesizing natural products with pharmaceutical potential. The work dislodges previously entrenched beliefs in the organic chemistry field about how such products must be produced, and could help to advance and expand the use of natural products in drug discovery programs.

  • February 27, 2007
    New Scripps Research Monoclonal Antibody Destroys Methamphetamine In Vitro
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a new monoclonal antibody that destroys the highly addictive drug methamphetamine. These new findings suggest an entirely new way to treat the global epidemic of methamphetamine abuse.

  • February 12, 2007
    Scripps Research Study Reveals Structural Dynamics of Single Prion Molecules
    Using a combination of novel technologies, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research have revealed for the first time a dynamic molecular portrait of individual unfolded yeast prions that form the compound amyloid, a fibrous protein aggregate associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease—the human version of mad cow disease.

  • February 12, 2007
    Scripps Research Team Discovers a Chemical Pathway that Causes Mice to Overeat and Gain Weight
    Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute who are studying how body temperature and energy metabolism are regulated have discovered a pathway that appears to play a critical role in the onset of obesity. Further study of the pathway could lead to better understanding of the physiological foundation of obesity in humans and even the discovery of new treatments for the condition.

  • February 5, 2007
    Scripps Research Scientists: Compounds Show Significant Promise Against Potential Bioweapon Toxins
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the University of Wisconsin have identified two small molecules with promising activity against neurotoxins produced by the Clostridium botulinum, a compound so deadly it has been labeled one of the six highest-risk bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

  • January 25, 2007
    Scripps Research Study Reveals New Function of Protein Kinase Pathway in Tumor Suppression
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a surprising new function of a well-known signaling pathway that, when activated, can inhibit tumor development. This finding may lead to the development of drugs that can serve as an effective cancer therapy by artificially activating this pathway in cancer cells.

  • January 21, 2007
    Scripps Research Study Reveals New Activation Mechanism for Pain Sensing Channel
    A group of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has identified a mechanism that enables certain compounds to activate a pain sensing protein. The findings could lead to the development of potential new therapies for managing acute and chronic pain.

  • January 9, 2007
    Scripps Research Combination Therapy Obliterates New Vessel Growth in Tumors and Retinopathy
    Using a new and dramatically effective treatment approach, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have for the first time achieved complete inhibition of new blood vessel growth in animal models of a highly vascular brain tumor and of neovascular eye diseases with little or no effect on normal tissue vasculature.

  • January 4, 2007
    Study Reveals Dynamic Interface of Molecular Clutch in Cell Migration
    Using a remarkable new technology, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a number of key protein interactions that allow cells to migrate throughout the body. These findings, which describe in detail how cells transmit molecular information into physical movement, provide the first direct analysis of cellular movement and may point the way to potential treatments for a variety of diseases including cancer.
2006
  • December 26, 2006
    Study Identifies Glucose "Sensor" That Plays Dual Role in Glucose Metabolism and Fat Synthesis
    In a new study, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have described for the first time a glucose activated sensor that acts as a switch to decrease production of endogenous glucose in the liver, and increase conversion of glucose to fat for storage in adipose tissue. This dual action makes the sensor, Liver X Receptor, a potential target for new therapies aimed at obesity and diabetes. The research may also have implications for heart disease and stroke.

  • December 20, 2006
    Scripps Research Study Questions Need for Potential Vaccine Additive
    A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has published a study that questions the need for incorporating an ingredient—TLR ligands— in vaccines to increase their effectiveness. Excluding TLR ligands would help keep down manufacturing costs and would avoid this ingredient’s potential side effects, such as inflammation and autoimmune syndromes.

  • November 30, 2006
    The Scripps Research Institute Enters Major Five-Year $100 Million Collaboration with Pfizer
    The Scripps Research Institute announced it has entered into a five year research collaboration with Pfizer Global Research and Development to advance scientific knowledge of uncured diseases and novel ways to treat them, making full use of emerging technologies and resident talent from both organizations.

  • November 17, 2006
    Scientists Identify Cells That Promote Repair of Blood Vessels in the Eye
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a method of repairing and normalizing blood vessels in the eye through the use of stem cells derived from bone marrow. These findings may point to a new approach for developing treatments for a certain type of eye diseases.
  • November 16, 2006
    Protein "Chaperone" Interactions Found to Play Major Role in Cystic Fibrosis
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have described for the first time key protein interactions that contribute to the development of cystic fibrosis. These findings may provide a new framework for the correction of cystic fibrosis and other protein folding diseases.

  • November 2, 2006
    Reduced Body Temperature Extends Lifespan in Study from The Scripps Research Institute
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that reducing the core body temperature of mice extends their median lifespan by up to 20 percent. This is the first time that changes in body temperature have been shown to affect lifespan in warm-blooded animals.

  • October 31, 2006
    Scientists Identify Synthetic Compound That Keeps Stem Cells Young
    A team of scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine has discovered a new synthetic compound that can support growth and self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells, offering a simple alternative to current growth conditions that may vary batch-to-batch and confuse experimental results.

  • October 20, 2006
    Study Offers Innovative Profile of Enzyme That Aids Tumor Growth
    Using an innovative profiling strategy, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have characterized an enzyme that is "highly elevated" in aggressive human tumor cells. When the enzyme, KIAA1363, was inactivated, it impaired tumor growth and migration in both ovarian and breast cancer cells, suggesting that inhibitors of this enzyme may prove valuable in the treatment of multiple types of cancer.

  • October 19, 2006
    New Study Shows How Genetic Repair Mechanism Helps Seal DNA Breaks
    A new study by researchers from The Scripps Research Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Washington University School of Medicine, and the University of Maryland has provided a clearer picture of the final steps of a critical DNA repair process. When these repair processes go awry, cells can malfunction, die, or become cancerous.

  • October 5, 2006
    $38 Million Grant Awarded to Alcohol Research Consortium Led by Scripps Research Institute Scientist
    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has funded a five-year, $38 million Integrative Neuroscience Initiative on Alcoholism grant to support a consortium led by a scientist at The Scripps Research Institute. The multi-institutional group aims to identify the molecular basis of alcoholism, establishing a platform upon which future treatments can be built.

  • September 19, 2006
    Study Details Structural Changes of a Key Catalytic Enzyme
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have detailed a new hypothesis of how a key catalytic enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR)--which is the target of several anticancer and antibiotic therapies--cycles through structural changes as it plays a critical role in promoting cell growth and proliferation.

  • September 14, 2006
    New Study Pinpoints Unique Genetic Susceptibility for Viral Encephalitis
    Working in close collaboration with a group of French researchers, scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have helped uncover a unique genetic immunodeficiency that leaves patients vulnerable to herpes simplex encephalitis, a rare yet devastating infection of the brain that affects a small minority of people infected with a common virus.

  • September 13, 2006
    The Scripps Research Institute, McDonald’s Align to Fight Childhood Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes
    The Scripps Research Institute and McDonald’s today announced a collaboration regarding research and educational initiatives to drive progress toward a solution to childhood obesity and Type 2 diabetes. McDonald’s will contribute $2 million to The Scripps Research Institute to address these critical health issues facing America’s youth.

  • September 8, 2006
    Study Shows Enzyme Builds Neurotransmitters Via Newly Discovered Pathway
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered a previously unknown function of an enzyme that appears to play a primary role in the biosynthesis of a large class of lipids that help modulate diverse physiological processes, including anxiety, inflammation, learning and memory, and appetite.

  • September 7, 2006
    Consortium for Functional Glycomics Awarded $40.7 Million "Glue" Grant
    The Scripps Research Institute’s Consortium for Functional Glycomics has received a $40.7 million "glue" grant for the international group of some 300 participating scientists to continue collaborative study of the complex dynamics of protein-carbohydrate interactions. The five-year grant, provided by The National Institute of General Medical Science (NIGMS), is the second NIGMS grant the consortium has received. The first, awarded in 2001, was a five-year grant of $34 million.

  • August 31, 2006
    New Study Unveils Structure of Key Component of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria
    Working in close collaboration with other researchers, scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered for the first time the structural chemistry behind the "astonishing multi-functionality" of the bacterial GC (for gonococcal) Type IV pilus filament, which plays an essential role in Neisseria gonorrhoeae pathogenesis. The Type IV pili allow antibiotic-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae to escape the immune system and cause persistent and recurrent gonorrhea infections.

  • August 20, 2006
    Scripps Research Team Reverses Friedreich’s Ataxia Defect in Cell Culture
    A team from The Scripps Research Institute and the University of California School of Medicine has developed compounds that reactivate the gene responsible for the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich’s ataxia, offering hope for an effective treatment for this devastating and often deadly condition.

  • August 10, 2006
    Scientists Discover Age-Regulated Cellular Activities That Protect Against Protein Aggregation
    By disrupting the aging process in an organism, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have discovered two mechanisms in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease that protect cells against protein aggregation that leads to damage called "proteotoxicity." Since proteotoxicity appears to cause the neurodegeneration in disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, these findings have important therapeutic implications.

  • August 9, 2006
    Marijuana’s Active Ingredient Shown to Inhibit Primary Marker of Alzheimer’s Disease
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that the active ingredient in marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol or THC, inhibits the formation of amyloid plaque, the primary pathological marker for Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, the study said, THC is "a considerably superior inhibitor of [amyloid plaque] aggregation" to several currently approved drugs for treating the disease.

  • July 31, 2006
    Scripps Research Scientists Successfully Test New Anti-Obesity Vaccine
    In what may be the first published breakthrough of its kind in the global battle against obesity, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed an anti-obesity vaccine that significantly slowed weight gain and reduced body fat in animal models.

  • July 30, 2006
    Newly Discovered Genetic Abnormality Shown to Cause Acute Myeloid Leukemia
    Working in collaboration with international researchers, scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered a new genetic abnormality that results in the rapid development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in animal models. These findings could lead to new ways of diagnosing and controlling development of a variety of human diseases, including leukemia and other cancers that result from certain types of genetic defects.

  • July 24, 2006
    "An Intimate Evening with Craig Chaquico"
    Craig Chaquico, the renowned lead guitarist of Jefferson Airplane/Starship and highly acclaimed contemporary instrumental artist, will perform at a dinner on August 13 to benefit the Molly Baber Research Fund at The Scripps Research Institute. The intimate event, from 6 to 10 PM, will feature a multi-station dinner under the stars at the Bernardo Heights Country Club, as well as an auction of a Craig Chaquico Model Carvin Guitar.

  • July 10, 2006
    Researchers Unveil Strategy for Creating Actively Programmed Anti-Cancer Molecules
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology have developed a unique assembly strategy to produce an anti-cancer targeting antibody, an approach that combines the merits of small molecule drug design with immunotherapy. Among the potential therapeutic advantages is a dramatically increased circulatory half-life of the compound, which could give patients greater exposure to the benefits of any treatment.


  • July 9, 2006
    Researchers Use New Chemical Probe to Manipulate Protective Inner Barriers
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the University of California, Irvine, have developed a chemical tool that allows them to manipulate control of the passage of substances through the barriers between blood and organ tissues. The findings have important therapeutic implications for a range of conditions, including organ transplants, autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis, and adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  • July 6, 2006
    Prion Disease Agent Causes Heart Damage in Mouse Study
    A team of researchers at The Scripps Research Institute, the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and Rocky Mountain Laboratories of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has shown for the first time that laboratory mice infected with the agent of scrapie—a brain-wasting disease of sheep—demonstrate high levels of the scrapie agent in their heart 300 days after being infected in the brain. These findings raise the possibility that heart infection could be a new aspect of prion diseases, including those that affect humans and livestock, and that these diseases could travel through the blood.

  • June 26, 2006
    Biogen Idec Foundation Funds Summer Teacher Internship Program At The Scripps Research Institute
    The Biogen Idec Foundation has donated $25,000 to support three teachers from San Diego public schools in The Scripps Research Institute’s Summer Internship Program for Teachers.

  • June 22, 2006
    Researchers Map Infectious Hepatitis B Virus
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have analyzed the structure of hepatitis B virus and found that it has unique features that distinguish it from other enveloped viruses such as influenza and herpes virus.

  • June 8, 2006
    Study Uncovers "Significant" Functional Differences of Novel Estrogen Receptor
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, working in collaboration with researchers from Creighton University and the Medical College of Zhejiang University (P.R. China), have discovered a novel variant of a known human estrogen receptor (hER-a66).

  • May 31, 2006
    Study Links Effects of Withdrawal to Compulsive Drug Use and Craving
    A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute; the National Institutes of Health Animal Center; and the University of Tokushima Graduate School (Japan) has provided some of the first evidence that compulsive drug use stems not from obtaining a drug’s pleasurable effects, but from an aversion to drug withdrawal. The finding could be used to help develop human therapies to block aspects of drug craving.

  • May 22, 2006
    John J. Moores Elected Chair of Scripps Research Institute Board of Trustees
    The Scripps Research Institute Board of Trustees today elected San Diego business leader and philanthropist John J. Moores as its new chair. Mr. Moores has been a Scripps Research trustee since 1997.

  • May 18, 2006
    New Study Suggests Virus Uses Pressure to Sense when Full of DNA
    A team of scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, the University of Alabama, and the University of Utah have created a three-dimensional reconstruction of the complete structure of the virus P22. This structure suggests that the virus uses a pressure mechanism to stop DNA loading, a mechanism that offers a potential drug target. Although P22 only infects bacteria, its structure is similar to the herpes virus, types of which cause oral and genital herpes, chicken pox, and mononucleosis.

  • May 17, 2006
    Study Details Hepatitis C Ability to Block Immune System Response
    A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has shed light on one mechanism the hepatitis C virus uses to inhibit the immune system and promote its own survival. Results of the study may help in the development of new approaches to the treatment of hepatitis C virus.

  • May 15, 2006
    New Study Reveals Signaling Pathways Required for Expansion of Pancreas Stem Cells
    A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has published a new study of important signaling pathways that are required for the expansion of pancreas stem cells, work that may lead to strategies to prevent or reverse insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). 

  • May 2, 2006
    Study Results Offer Guidance in Treatment of Alcohol Dependence
    A large-scale study of different treatment approaches for alcohol dependence underlines that medication can play a key role in treatment. 

  • April 26, 2006
    Immune Response to HIV in the Brain a "Double-Edged Sword"
    A team of researchers at The Scripps Research Institute has shed new light on the molecular basis of problems with brain function in models chronically infected with an immune deficiency virus similar to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The findings may ultimately lead to new therapeutic interventions to prevent or reverse nervous system disorders in HIV-infected individuals. 

  • April 25, 2006
    Revealing the Secrets of WRN
    A team of scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Scripps Research Institute has determined the crystal structure and molecular mechanisms of a key part of WRN, a protein that protects humans from premature aging and cancer. 

  • April 20, 2006
    Lack of a Key Enzyme Dramatically Increases Resistance to Sepsis
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, The La Jolla Institute of Allergy and Immunology, and Merck Research Laboratories have uncovered a "fundamentally new role" for an enzyme that when present in vivo in certain forms impedes the immune response to bacterial infection. According to the new study, the presence of caspase-12, which appears to modulate inflammation and innate immunity in humans, increases the body’s "vulnerability to bacterial infection and septic shock" while a deficiency confers strong resistance to sepsis. This new discovery suggests that caspase-12 antagonists could be a potentially useful in the treatment of sepsis and other inflammatory and immune disorders.

  • April 18, 2006
    Study Shows Gene Candidates for Predisposition to Alcohol Abuse
    A collaborative study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute as part of the Integrative Neuroscience Initiative on Alcoholism Consortium (INIA) have identified some 3,800 "unique genes" that may determine a predisposition for a high degree of alcohol intake. The meta analysis, which examined more than 4.5 million data points on more than 100 microarrays from mouse models, also identified more than 1,300 functional groups, including signaling and transcription pathways, which may also play an important role in establishing a capacity for a "high level of alcohol consumption." 

  • April 6, 2006
    Enzyme Crystal Structure Reveals "Unexpected" Genome Repair Functions
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have determined the crystal structure of an enzyme called xeroderma pigmentosum group B (XPB) helicase, identifying several unexpected functions and helping to address important questions about the enzyme’s role in DNA transcription and repair. The research illuminated, for the first time, the roles played by the important XPB protein in recognizing blockages in reading the DNA code and in initiating an efficient method of repair. The discovery may be useful in the quest to develop new forms of chemotherapy.

  • March 31, 2006
    Dyadic Partners with Scripps Florida to Annotate Dyadic's Proprietary Cl Genome
    Dyadic International, Inc. (AMEX: OIL), a biotechnology company, announced today that it has engaged The Scripps Research Institute to work with Dyadic scientists to provide a complete annotation of the genome of Dyadic's proprietary fungal organism, Chrysosporium lucknowense ("Cl"), which was sequenced by another vendor last year.

  • March 24, 2006
    New Class of Enzyme Inhibitors Block Replication of SARS Virus
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a class of compounds that block the SARS virus from replicating, a finding that may open the door to new drug targets against the deadly disease.

  • March 24, 2006
    "Accelerated Evolution" Converts RNA Enzyme to DNA Enzyme In Vitro
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have successfully converted an RNA enzyme (ribozyme) into a DNA enzyme (deoxyribozyme) through a process of accelerated in vitro evolution. The molecular conversion or transfer of both genetic information and catalytic function between these two different genetic systems, which are both based on nucleic acid-like molecules, is exactly what many scientists believe occurred during the very earliest period of earth’s existence.

  • March 17, 2006
    Four of the Nation’s Preeminent Research Institutions Announce Stem Cell Research Alliance
    Four of the nation’s preeminent research institutions, all based in San Diego, have announced their commitment to join forces in establishing an independent, non-profit consortium dedicated to stem cell research.

  • March 16, 2006
    Minor Mutations in Avian Flu Virus Increase Chances of Human Infection
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, the Centers for Disease Control, and the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology have identified what the researchers described as a possible pathway for a particularly virulent strain of the avian flu virus H5N1 "to gain a foothold in the human population."

  • March 14, 2006
    Newly Discovered Small Molecules "Superactivate" Botox
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered several small molecules that can "superactivate" the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the commonly used cosmetic treatment for wrinkles known as Botox that has a number of therapeutic uses.

  • March 9, 2006
    Novel Method Reveals How Menthol Creates Cold Sensations
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (GNF) have developed a method that can aid in understanding how certain proteins can be activated. The group used this new methodology to study the molecular mechanism by which menthol, the cooling compound derived from mint leaves, enhances the activity of TRPM8, an ion channel protein involved in our ability to feel cold temperature through the skin.

  • February 27, 2006
    Fluorescent Viral Nanoparticles Permit High Resolution In Vivo Vascular Imaging
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have shown that cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) can be used as an "exceptionally bright" imaging agent that permits high resolution in vivo visualization of the vascular endothelium, the cells that line the inside of blood vessels, for as long as 72 hours. These results strongly suggest that fluorescently dyed CPMV nanoparticles could become a "powerful tool" to image tissues deep inside living organisms in the laboratory and, potentially, in a clinical setting as well.

  • February 20, 2006
    New Study Shows Antibody-Interleukin Complexes Stimulate Immune Responses
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have shown that injections of a certain cytokine together with the right monoclonal antibody increases white blood cells that coordinate immune responses to tumor and infected cells. These results may point the way to an improved cancer therapy that helps patients boost their own immune response to the disease. The findings could also be significant for developing new ways to help patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or juvenile diabetes.

  • February 7, 2006
    High Resolution "Snapshots" Detail Dynamics of a Cocaine Antibody
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have revealed for the first time a series of molecular structures of a specific cocaine-degrading monoclonal antibody Fab’ fragment during the complete catalytic process—a chain of events that breaks the drug into nontoxic pieces. Understanding these significant structural changes of the antibody 7A1 could help in the development of a treatment for cocaine addiction. A monoclonal antibody is cloned from a single type of immune cell.

  • February 6, 2006
    Scientists Re-engineer a Well-Known Antibiotic to Counter Drug Resistance
    Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have successfully re-engineered a well-known antibiotic to insure its effectiveness against sensitive as well as resistant enterococci, a common strain of bacteria responsible for widespread hospital infections.

  • January 31, 2006
    Protein Found to Control Tumor Growth in Certain Breast Cancers
    Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the Xiamen University School of Life Sciences, Fujian, People’s Republic of China, have uncovered a new and potentially important function for the protein Nod1, inhibiting the growth of estrogen sensitive human breast cancer cells.

  • January 16, 2006
    New Technology Effectively Gauges Specificity of Influenza Strains, Including 1918 Spanish Flu
    A team of researchers led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has used a new technology called a glycan array to survey samples of coat proteins from various strains of human and avian viruses, including from the deadly 1918 influenza outbreak know as the Spanish Flu.

  • January 13, 2006
    Study Reveals Unusual Structure of Cellular Transport Nanocage
    A new study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has revealed for the first time the structure of Sec13/31, a "nanocage" that transports a large body of proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which makes up more than half the total internal cell membrane, to other regions of the cell. 
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
  • October 26, 2000
    TSRI Scientist Wins Presidential Early Career Award
    Geoffrey Chang, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular Biology, was named by President Clinton as one of the recipients of the fifth annual Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers.

  • September 26, 2000
    New Genomic Center Funded To Advance HighThroughput Protein Structure Determination
    The Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), a consortium of California scientific research organizations, has received a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant of $24 million over a five- year period to expand on the body of knowledge made av ailable by the completion of the human and other genome sequencing projects.

  • August 4, 2000
    TSRI Scientists Clone Gene that Regulates Circadian Rhythms in Plants
    Scientists at TSRI have cloned a gene that regulates circadian rhythms in plants, providing an increased understanding -- on a molecular level -- of the processes that enable organisms to anticipate and adapt to daily variations in the environment. Further, researchers believe that understanding internal "clocks" in plants might also elucidate how clocks work in other species, including humans.

  • July 6, 2000
    Chi-Huey Wong, Ph.D., Receives 2000 Presidential Green Chemistry Award
    Chi-Huey Wong, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Chemistry and The Skaggs Institute at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), has been selected to receive a 2000 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award, jointly presented by the Director of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology and President of the American Chemical Society.

  • June 1, 2000
    Sandra L. Schmid, Ph.D., Named to Head Department of Cell Biology
    Professor Sandra L. Schmid, Ph.D., The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), has been named Chairman of the Department of Cell Biology, effective July 1, 2000, according to Richard A. Lerner, M.D., TSRI President. She will replace Norton B. Gilula, Ph.D., current Department Chairman and Dean of Graduate Studies. While he will continue to head the graduate program, he also recently was named Vice President, Scientific Affairs.

  • May 25, 2000
    Ian A. Wilson, D.Phil., Elected to Royal Society
    Ian A. Wilson, D.Phil., Professor, Department of Molecular Biology and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), has been elected to fellowship in the Royal Society, the independent scientific academy of the United Kingdom, dedicated to promoting excellence in science.

  • March 31, 2000
    The Genetics of Aging
    Gradual genetic changes may be the source of many, if not all illnesses of aging, including breast cancer, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis.

  • January 28, 2000
    Software for the Genome Created by TSRI Scientists
    Scientists at TSRI have developed a method of producing and combining proteins as modular building blocks capable of functioning as genetic switches to turn on or off genes on demand.
  • January 26, 2000
    Scientists Discover Evolutionary Adaptation to DNA Repair in Human Cells
    Researchers studying a key human DNA repair enzyme have discovered an evolutionary adaptation that highlights a fundamental advantage in the way human cells repair damage to their DNA. The study, "DNA-Bound Structure and Mutants Reveal A Basic DNA Binding by APE1 Coordinates DNA Repair," appears in the January 27 issue of Nature.

  • January 21, 2000
    K. Barry Sharpless Receives National Academy of Sciences Award in Chemical Sciences
    K. Barry Sharpless, Ph.D., W.M. Keck Professor of Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, has been selected to receive the National Academy of Sciences Award in Chemical Sciences.
1999
1998
1997
  • December 19, 1997
    Antibody aldolases with enzymic rates but broader scope
    For the first time, scientists have developed a catalytic antibody with an efficiency rate and mechanism equal to that of a natural enzyme essential to life. They compared aldolases that use the same chemical mechanisms but differ in their origin.

  • November 28, 1997
    Biological clocks no longer found only in the brain
    A discovery by a team of scientists at TSRI and Brandeis University challenges the belief that 24-hour rhythms, or biological clocks, are centrally controlled from the brain. Using the fruit fly as a genetic model system, the research sought to determine if individual body parts would respond to changes in the light/dark cycle without any help from the head.
  • November 19, 1997
    Total synthesis of eleutherobin and...
    The first total chemical synthesis of a number of promising new anticancer compounds, first isolated from a rare species of corals, has been performed by a scientific team at TSRI. The group assembled the compounds by designing a multistep strategy using simple chemical building blocks such as carvone, an oil readily available from caraway or dill seeds, frequently used as a commodity chemical in perfumes and foods.

  • November 10, 1997
    Prominent scientists join TSRI
    TSRI has recruited a number of prominent scientists to its staff, all of whom hold dual appointments in The Skaggs Institute for Chemical biology as well as in other institutional departments. They are Paul Schimmel, Ph.D., former John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at MIT; Jeffery W. Kelly, Ph.D., Former Professor, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M; Martha J. Fedor, Ph.D., former Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center; and James R. Williamson, Ph.D., former Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, MIT.

  • October 31, 1997
    Affordable, hand-held biosensor for diagnostics
    A portable, hand-held biosensor capable of detecting a wide range of medically important chemical compounds has been created by a team of researchers from TSRI and University of California, San Diego.

  • October 17, 1997
    Structure of Nitric Oxide Synthase...
    Researchers at TSRI and the Cleveland Clinic have solved the structure of the active site of the enzyme that regulates the activity of nitric oxide (NO).
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